Patricia Rossi's Blog

Read up on some amazing blog posts by Patricia
Knowing the Etiquette of Personal Space

Knowing the Etiquette of Personal Space

There is a certain distance that people should stand from one another to maintain a comfortable level of personal space. When someone gets too close, you immediately know it – which can cause anxious feelings.

Although there are no exact rules about the correct distance that you should separate yourself from others at the office, try to leave two to four feet between you and whoever you are coming into contact with.

Following this guideline can help you make good interactions with others. Invading personal space can create problems and send bad messages without you even knowing it.

The following are some tips to help you keep your distance and reputation positive –

1~ Defend Gently. Don’t even raise your hand and ask someone to take a ‘step back’, as this only causes a very awkward moment. If you feel uncomfortable about your distance, just take a small step back while talking. Another way of keeping your space is to be holding something, like papers or a beverage in front of you, to help keep someone at bay.

2~ Noise. If you are at a networking event where the noise volume is high, sometimes people move in closer in order to hear you better. To avoid them getting too close, be sure to speak directly to them at a volume that they can hear.

3~ Touching. Hugging is a gesture shown among family and close friends, while at work it can be unwelcome. Make sure that you know the recipient very well before reaching out to them that closely. In business situations, a firm handshake is the most appropriate gesture, showing warmth without any personal infringements.

4~ Background Check. If you travel to other countries for business, make sure to check their local customs and traditions first before showing affection. Personal space varies in certain countries and you don’t want to offend without even knowing it. Do your homework before you leave for the trip.

5~ Relationships Matter. The closer you are to someone, the nearer you interact with them. The general rule of thumb is for those you don’t know well, you should stand five to 10 feet apart while talking. When socializing, you can stand two to five feet from someone and intimate space is shown at a two foot distance.

Using these guidelines can help you feel better with your office and networking interactions, knowing that you are at a proper distance to keep your professional reputation moving forward.

How to Handle a Talkative Coworker

There is usually at least one extremely talkative person in every office. These are the type of people that don’t care if you are busy working - as they will continue to tell you their every life event. The good news is that instead of getting frustrated with the non...

read more

Business Coffee Meeting Etiquette

Scheduling a quick meeting or office work session at a coffee shop has become very popular in today’s business world. Meeting over a cup of coffee is a great way to change the normal environment, while sparking caffeinated creativity. Because most professionals are...

read more

How to Become a Better Communicator

Most people can easily talk to others, but lack some of the small ideas that help to fully get their point across, especially while dealing with colleagues and clients. Clean communication at the office brings more productively in a peaceful atmosphere. Obstacles that...

read more

Fun Ways to Enjoy the End of Summer

Although school is about to start and all of the local stores are already stocking their shelves with fall and winter items, summer is not quite over yet. The good news is that there is still time to enjoy the warm weather before the hectic fall lifestyle starts...

read more

Stay Connected with Patricia

book-sidebar

Categories

Archives

What Patricia's Clients are Saying:

“Patricia brought into a fruition a vision for Inclusive Student Excellence at UNC. The experience was once-in-a-lifetime for many students and still is a hot topic for conversation. Patricia was the perfect inaugural keynote speaker for our College to Corporate program!”

Ada Wilson Suitt
J.D. Director of Inclusive Student Excellence / University of North Carolina

“I thought it was very valuable. Though you cannot possibly take away everything, I think there were some key takeaways that I will certainly roll into my daily life. Inspire would be a great venue for her, because she would be especially “inspiring” to women and they would enjoy interacting with her and hearing her story in general. A speaker like Patricia is invaluable and something I took as a privilege to sit through.

Renee Buzek
Strategic Account Manager / Moen

Dear Patricia, Thank You, Thank You, Thank You!! The evening was amazing. You are full of love to share and that was very clear in the atmosphere. Everyone was engaged and loving every minute of your presentation. I’ve had so many great comments and the best was: “This was the best program we have done” I was super excited and wanted to share the positive feedback.

Mayu Fielding
Pirates Baseball Organization Education Coordinator / Pittsburgh Pirates

“Thank you so much for your active and hands-on role in our Women’s Leadership Networking Event yesterday.
The positive feedback just keeps coming in! You inspired me and our group to think and act differently in the way we approach networking in social situations. I look forward to reading your current and future books. I truly hope our paths will cross again in the not too distant future.”

Alison Hinds-Pearl
Senior Compliance Counsel / Bayer

“Patricia Rossi’s Pro “Active” Protocol for the professional athlete – essential. Touch down technique for stellar social media, community, and team success. Enables each and every athlete to succeed on and off the field.”

Terry Cousin
Steelers Player Engagement Coordinator / Pittsburgh Steelers

Dear Patricia, Thank you for speaking for PNC wealth management today. I learned so much, all of which I can apply to every part of my life. I hope we can work together again!

Judy Jadlowiec